Tuesday, May 22, 2012

So, looks like no Black Widow movie?

She Has No Head! – Dear Marvel: Please Stop Ruining Everything | Comics Should Be Good! @ Comic Book Resources
In a chat afterwards, Joe told me that he’d love to make a tentpole [sic] movie with a female lead, but that he really doesn’t think there is an actress right now who could carry it, or a character that would work either.
Trivial issue: I don't get the "sic" on the phrase "tentpole movie". That's what they call a film they can build their summer release schedule around. The metaphor is that of a circus tent, with one big show and a collection of lesser attractions. Is "sic" what you say when you want to attempt a sexual entendre, but can't really think of one?

Main issue: Well, the reason I linked to Kelly Thompson's "She Has No Head!" and not the Ain't It Cool News remark that inspired it is that the smackdown has already been done. But I certainly didn't expect the Editor-in-Chief, head cheerleader and heir to Stan "the Man" Lee himself to go dissin' his own superbabes that way.

Perhaps this is the wrong time to point out that the "underwhelming" "Elektra" outgrossed either "Punisher" movie.

This is a production company that already has Scarlett Johansson (Iron Man 2, Avengers), Natalie Portman (Star Wars), Gwyneth Paltrow (won an Oscar for Shakespeare in Love), and Liv Tyler (Lord of the Rings) under contract. And Johansson is the first one they've used as anything other than a secretary.

Shall we also discuss Halle Berry, Anna Paquin, Jennifer Connelly, Jessica Alba and Cobie Smulders, all of whom seem to be able to carry other people's movies and shows?

Really, dude, you're just not trying.

2 comments:

1979semifinalist said...

I used [sic] because that is what you use when there is a typo in something you're quoting but you want to quote it accurately.

I probably could have left it out because a lot of people seem to spell tent-pole as tentpole, but I'd always seen it spelled with a hyphen, so I added the [sic].

So that's what that is about. :)

Daniel said...

Thanks for the clarification. I'll happily take back any implied snark.

I'm grammar-weenie enough to have looked it up. Usage seems approximately evenly split between "tent-pole", "tentpole", and "tent pole".